The standing-up seats that’ll let airlines cram in more passengers


Economy class cabins may be about to resemble sardine tins rather than cattle trucks in the near future.

That’s because an Italian seat manufacturer has unveiled seating that’s so upright passengers using it will practically be standing up.

Should any carriers install it, they will be able to cram in more fliers than ever before, in a formation that’s known in the industry as ‘ultra-high density’.

An Italian seat manufacturer has unveiled seating that¿s so upright passengers using it will practically be standing up.

An Italian seat manufacturer has unveiled seating that¿s so upright passengers using it will practically be standing up.

An Italian seat manufacturer has unveiled seating that’s so upright passengers using it will practically be standing up.

The upright seating is called Skyrider 2.0 and was unveiled by manufacturer Aviointeriors at the Aircraft Interiors Expo 2018 in Hamburg. The horse-saddle-style seating is an improved version of a concept it tried ¿ and failed - to launch in 2010

The upright seating is called Skyrider 2.0 and was unveiled by manufacturer Aviointeriors at the Aircraft Interiors Expo 2018 in Hamburg. The horse-saddle-style seating is an improved version of a concept it tried ¿ and failed - to launch in 2010

The upright seating is called Skyrider 2.0 and was unveiled by manufacturer Aviointeriors at the Aircraft Interiors Expo 2018 in Hamburg. The horse-saddle-style seating is an improved version of a concept it tried – and failed – to launch in 2010

Aviointeriors claims that its design will enable carriers to fit 20 per cent more people into a cabin, as legroom will be diminished from around 28 inches to 23

Aviointeriors claims that its design will enable carriers to fit 20 per cent more people into a cabin, as legroom will be diminished from around 28 inches to 23

Aviointeriors claims that its design will enable carriers to fit 20 per cent more people into a cabin, as legroom will be diminished from around 28 inches to 23

The upright seating is called Skyrider 2.0 and was unveiled by manufacturer Aviointeriors at the Aircraft Interiors Expo 2018 in Hamburg recently.

The horse-saddle-style seating is an improved version of a concept it tried – and failed – to launch in 2010.

Skyrider 2.0 has more padding than the previous version and firmer mountings, with poles connecting each row to the ceiling and floor, instead of the frame just being fitted to a rail.

Aviointeriors claims that its design will enable carriers to fit 20 per cent more people into a cabin, as legroom will be diminished from around 28 inches to 23.

It said in a statement: ‘The Skyrider 2.0 is an innovative seat. It allows an ultra-high density in the aircraft cabin. Skyrider 2.0 opens the travelling experience to a wider passenger market, creating also a useful space for the introduction of mixed classes boarded on the same aircraft.

Aviointeriors claims that this seating represents ¿the new frontier of low-cost tickets and passenger experience¿

Aviointeriors claims that this seating represents ¿the new frontier of low-cost tickets and passenger experience¿

Aviointeriors claims that this seating represents ‘the new frontier of low-cost tickets and passenger experience’

‘Its main feature is the original bottom that ensures an increased upright passenger positon allowing installation of the seat at a reduced pitch, while maintaining an adequate comfort.

‘The design of this seat enables [carriers] to increase the passenger number by 20 per cent allowing increasing profits for airline companies.’

The company added that Skyrider 2.0 weighs 50 per cent less than standard economy seats and has a reduced number of components for ‘minimum maintenance costs’.

Its claim is that this seating represents ‘the new frontier of low-cost tickets and passenger experience’.

Whether that’s true, of course, remains to be seen.

It’s not known whether any airlines have bought the seating yet.

In 2010 Ryanair conducted a poll of 120,000 people and found that 80,000 of them would consider upright seats if they were free, while 42 per cent said they would use them if the fare was half that of a traditional ticket. 

In 2010 Ryanair conducted a poll of 120,000 people and found that 80,000 of them would consider upright seats if they were free

In 2010 Ryanair conducted a poll of 120,000 people and found that 80,000 of them would consider upright seats if they were free

In 2010 Ryanair conducted a poll of 120,000 people and found that 80,000 of them would consider upright seats if they were free


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